Paris 2013: Day 33 — Rain and the Louvre (Part 3)


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Under the Louvre’s Pyramid — a monumental sculpture of the young French conceptual artist Loris Gréaud. It offers a somewhat ghostly allusion to the museum’s ancient masterpieces. The 10 meters tall aluminum sculpture is covered by a cloak, as if just about to reveal itself to public eyes. Moreover, it’s purposefully placed on the very edge of the plinth, suggesting that the slightest vibration might cause it to tumble down right onto the crowd of inquisitive onlookers. “They are supposed to be terrified and I know how they feel,” says the artist.

Sunday, 08/25/13

I woke up at 8:30am.  The apartment was cool and the bed was nice and toasty.   Besides, what is there to wake to — it is raining.

Well, it had to happen sometime I suppose.   We have been very fortunate with the weather on this trip.  The majority of our stay here has been blessed with wonderfully warm and sunny days.  Should I complain about a day of rain?  Yes, if it happens to be our last day in Paris I feel I can complain about it at least a little.

For breakfast, I make french toast with the remaining Challah bread — it was delicious!    My DH takes a nap and I work on the blog before we leave for our last visit of the Louvre.

Yes, this is our third trip to the Louvre.  We have one more wing to see — the Sully.  With any luck, we will have time to see the top floors of the Denon and Richelieu wings too.

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A map of the first floor of the Louvre. There are three other floors in each wing.

We need our umbrellas as we walk to the Metro.   But once in the Metro, our Metro stop is right under the Louvre so rain is no longer a problem.   We arrive at the Louvre around 2pm.  Let’s face it — the best place to be on a rainy day is in a museum.  By the size of the crowd, I would say that every tourist in Paris would agree with that statement.

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Looking for the ticket machines.
Oops — Pardon moi!

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Hey! Stop shoving, already!
Geeeez!

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We’re in!  Did you know that the Louvre was originally a palace for the Kings of France? Before that, it was a castle that comprised only a corner of the Sully Wing. It is nice and cool down here among these ancient stones!

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WTF! Who put neon lights on these ancient stones!!!
Ain’t there a law against that????

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Now entering the Egyptian wing…

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…where we find the sarcophagus of Ramses III…

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…and other unknown Egyptians…

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…and the mummy of an Egyptian women…

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…and an Egyptian cat…

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…and a horde of Egyptian Funeral Servants (to keep the tomb clean)…

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…and a Egyptian DH with Egyptian Anna!

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If it is in the Louvre, is it art?

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After Egypt, we enter Italy. These are the “Three Graces” — a common theme with artists of any media. The “graces” could be anything but usually they are something like charm, beauty, and creativity.

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Hey, Venus! Nice to see you again!

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Did I mention all the paintings that we barely saw?

So, what can be so bad about being where everyone wants to be?  The short list would include the long lines for just about everything.  There was a long line to purchase tickets, to check your coats and bags,  to see the Egyptian exhibits, the Roman exhibits, the eat in the cafeteria, and to use the ladies restroom.   It seems a shame to me that of the four hours we were at the Louvre, we spend twenty percent of it waiting in line for something — this bugs me to no end!   Still, we saw some fantastic art — so much of it that we didn’t make it to the top floor of any wing.   Oh well, maybe on our next trip to Paris…?

The Louvre closed at 6pm.   By this time, the rain had stopped and turned to a light mist.  The air was crisp and cool so we did not mind the 1+ mile walk to a our restaurant for our last French dinner at La Poule au Pot.   This place was classic French, just perfect for our last night here!

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The Louvre closed at 6pm so we decided to walk to dinner. This is the Arc de Triomphe du Carrousel.

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We walked past the fountain in the Tuileries Garden.

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We walked down Rue Saint-Honoré in a light Parisian mist.

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Dinner time!

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Ah, this place is so French! The food is supposed to be good too — I know, I researched it!

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Boy, this Kir helps to settle my nerves after an afternoon at the Louvre.

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My DH ordered the Lamb Shank. It was flavorful and tender, just like it is supposed to be!

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I ordered the special of the day — Chicken in a Creamy Morel Sauce! It was tasty!

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We had a wonderful table by the window. We ate and watched the rain as it got dark.

By 8pm, we are pleasantly stuffed as we leave the restaurant.   We are also tired!   You wouldn’t think that standing around all day would take a toll on you, but it does!  Still, we took our time in locating a Metro stop as we took our final evening walk through this magical city!   I know that sounds really, really cliché, but it is.

Quote of the day:   “Honey, sneak me into the men’s room?” — Anna

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